Tagged: West Africa

Beyoncé channels Yoruba Goddess Oshun.

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I loved Bey’s performance at the GRAMMYs on Sunday. I loved it even more because one of the two songs performed, was co-written by my good friend Ingrid Burley!

Some people are saying that Bey’s look was inspired by the Yoruba goddess Oshun. The Yoruba people are “descendants from variety of West African communities” who are “united by geography, history, religion and most importantly language.” The main countries where the Yoruba people live are Nigeria, Togo and Benin. In their religion, Oshun is the “goddess of water, fertility, motherhood, and the passing of the generations.” This deity is also responsible for blessing women with twins. As you [may] know, Bey is pregnant with twins. For more information on the Yoruba, click here.

I’ve always loved Bey, but I love her even more for continuing to use her platform to help [re]awaken the psyche of Africans, especially those living in the United States of America.

More pics from her performance are below:

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“In accordance with the economic policies of the Stuart monarchy, the slave trade was entrusted to a monopolistic company, the Company of Royal Adventurers trading to Africa, incorporated in 1663 for a period of one thousand years. The Earl of Clarendon voiced the enthusiasm current at the time, that the company would ‘be found a model equally to advance the trade of England with that of any other company, even that of the East Indies.’ The optimistic prediction was not realized, largely as a result of losses and dislocations caused by war with the Dutch, and in 1672 a new company, the Royal African Company, was created.”

Source: Eric Williams. Capitalism & Slavery. pg. 30-31. 1944.

“After passing the ‘Right of Abode’ law, which grants African Americans an indefinite ‘right to stay,’ Ghana became the first to open its doors to people of African descent to settle in the country. African-Americans and some Caribbeans have slowly trickled back but the process of obtaining a permanent resident status is long and frustrating.”

Didn’t know about Ghana’s “Right of Abode” law…Did you?

America would be NOTHING without us! As the U.S. economy continues to take a nosedive and blatant forms of white racism rise in the U.S., black Americans need to seriously consider migrating back to the Motherland.

We could take what we’ve learned here over the last 400 years to help make Africa and the entire world a much better place.

No matter what, new solutions are needed to combat white racism. Collecting the reparations that are owed and leaving this sinking ship en masse sounds good idea to me.

Source: Efam Dovi. “Ghana, A Place For African-Americans To Resettle.” May 11, 2015. http://www.theafricareport.com/West-Africa/ghana-a-place-for-african-americans-to-resettle.html.

“[Y]ou have been told that unless Europeans teach you, you haven’t been taught, but who told you that the first university built in all of Europe was built by Africans called Moors at what is called the University of Salamanca in Spain? Check it out. Europe’s first university. Not only were the stones put together like the stones and the bricks in most of the buildings here. I’m not talking about that aspect of the building. I’m talking about the [Western] educational system [being] nothing but a copy of the University of Djenné of ancient Ghana, which was burnt down and rebuilt as the University of Sankoré in the city of Timbuk, which the French later called Timbuktu. Then carried as the Africans called Moors conquered Iberia — now Spain, Portugal and southern France — and established there the university system. And as I said before, it was not the first. The earliest of the Greeks were trained in a place called the Subordinate Lodges of Croton and Delphi [and] the Subordinate or Grand Lodges in a place called Waset, which the Greeks later changed to Thebes [and] the current Arabs changed it to Luxor. But [were you taught] that in Greek philosophy? Did you get it in Greek history of European history? None whatsoever.” — Dr. Yosef Ben Jochannan

Thoth.

Thoth

The person depicted here is a man named Thoth, pronounced with a long o. (Some people say Thawth, but he pronounces it Thōth.) The hieroglyph shows his head as an ibis, a bird. So whenever you see this man with wide shoulders and a strange-looking bird head, it’s a hieroglyph depicting this particularity being, Thoth….[H]e was the first person who introduced writing to the world. The introduction of writing was a profoundly important event, probably the most influential act that has ever occurred on this planet in this cycle. It made more changes in our evolution and consciousness than any other single act in our known history.

Weighing_of_the_Heart

A lot of important Egyptians gods on the papyrus above. The scene is found in the Book of the Dead, and it was titled “Weighing of the Heart.” The Europeans stole this, along with many other precious artifacts from Egypt, and now, it can be viewed in the Egyptian Archive of the British Museum.

Source: Drunvalo Melchizede. The Ancient Secret of the Flower of Life: An Edited Transcript. Volume 1. pg. 21. 1998.

“‘There will never be a nigger in SAE!’ chanted a bunch of Biebers from the dark side. The OU frat video released earlier this week shocked the nation. But not me. I never believed the lie of a post-racial America, so new heights of white shittiness don’t surprise me. Instead, my mind went to that kid who still longed to be the unwanted “nigger” in a fraternity where he’d be like Baldwin’s “fly in the buttermilk.” That black boy or girl who has no idea who the hell s/he is, who thinks that finding a home in places like the SAE house might offer some desperately needed sense of belonging. I write this in the hopes of reaching that lost black body floating adrift in the chaos of racial identity — just like I did for much of my life.”

Wow!!! This is going to be a great read!

While reading the quote above, I thought about Chief Judge Loretta A. Preska’s recent visit to Columbia Law School, where she gave a speech about the perceived threat to First Amendment rights taking place on college campuses throughout the U.S. She saw it to to be a problem that schools were crumbling under pressure to the demands of students and rescinding their offers of having divisive and ignorant public figures like Ann Coulter speak at their campuses. Based on her statements, it seems like she would say that the racist speech of the SAE members should be protected/totally acceptable and that the university should not have taken any adverse actions against this predominately all-white fraternity. The reason why? Because she is RACIST! I wanted to ask her a question including a scenario like this, but in a room full of white people, I didn’t want to get all Malcolm X up on her ass. Shouldn’t racist speech, language, THINKING be out right BANNED now that we live in a “post-racial society”? I wish!! Should African American and other non-racist students have to tolerate shit like this from whites when their alleged superiority is based on nothing more than a lie? I don’t think so!!! This shit has got to change…

Source: Kasai Rex. “I Was The Black Guy In A White Frat.” Salon. March 15, 2015. http://www.salon.com/2015/03/16/my_shucking_and_jiving_years_i_was_the_black_guy_in_a_white_frat/.

“Today Africa is recognized as the very cradle of the human race.”

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If the National Geographic knows this to be true, why are those in power who have the responsibility of determining what is taught in our Western educational system, still refusing to teach the truth about Africa being the birthplace of humanity and civilization? The answer is simple: to maintain the myth of white racial superiority. It’s the same reason why Jesus is still being portrayed as white and having European features…How much different would society be if our realities were shaped by truth and not lies?

Source: Kenneth F. Weaver. “Stones, Bones, and Early Man: The Search for Our Ancestors.” National Geographic, Vol. 168, No. 5. November 1985.